Category Archives: Germany

Dusseldorf, Germany by Train, Tram and Foot – Christmas Market

Saturday morning we finished packing our “stuff” and said goodbye to our cozy room.  We went to the dining room where had our breakfast , said goodbye to staff and friends and then walked to the train station, about 5 minutes away.  Since it was early on a Saturday morning there was no traffic and no bicyclists to worry about.

Deciding to get to the train station early to make sure we knew which track our train would be arriving gave is a little too much time but we didn’t care.  We went up the escalator to the track and we began to have a few doubts.   We had second class tickets (non-reserved) and how would we know which cars  were second class?  How would we know which seats we could sit in since we didn’t book reserved seats.  I’ve got the answers for you.  When standing on the track look up.  On the electronic sign board they will have an electronic image of a train with letters above it and numbers in the train cars.  The letters above is where the train car will stop on the platform; the number inside the train will have a 1, or  2 for first or second class.  Once inside the train, and underneath the luggage racks, if there is nothing in electronic red letters, those seats are unreserved.  Many seats will have a destination and those have been reserved.  We had chosen to not purchase reserved seats as they cost about $30 more each way.  Since Amsterdam was the beginning of the route, we did not have a problem finding seats once we figured it all out.  As the train got more crowded as we traveled to Dusseldorf we began to rethink our choice of not having reserved seats for our return as we saw people standing in the aisle trying to push their luggage.   Dusseldorf would be after Cologne on our return and it was one of the larger stops on this route.  Like Scarlett O’Hara, we decided we wouldn’t think about it today, we would think about it tomorrow when we were leaving.

When we arrived at the train station in Dusseldorf we went to the train/bus office to buy the tram ticket to go to the hotel.  We made one small mistake at our stop – we didn’t get off.  The tram stopped but we thought it was at a light but it wasn’t – it was our stop that we saw as we kept going.   We decided that our problem was that the doors to the tram didn’t open.  What we needed to do to let the driver know we wanted to get off was push the big button by the door for it to open.  Luckily the next stop was about 75 feet away and we just walked to the hotel from there – the Radisson Blu.  Since my cruise mate had booked the hotel we were going to be given a standard room but when I pulled out my Radisson Rewards (formerly Club Carlson) gold loyalty card at the check in desk, we were upgraded to a business room which was larger.  Even though we were there for only one night and used to a small room, it felt wonderful.  The best part – each of us had a queen bed rather than a very small twin bed from the cruise.

Having these credit cards that give you status in a hotel is really worth it.  The ones I have are Radisson Rewards, IHG, and Marriott.  I did have SPG till the merger with Marriott. Hilton will also give you some status as well as Hyatt.  I plan on applying for the World of Hyatt card this spring since it will be 25 months since I closed my previous Hyatt card.

We spent very little time at the hotel and went to the tram stop where we were given help as to which tram to get on and which stop to get off.  Now we needed to figure out how to purchase tram tickets on the ticket machine at the stop.  After about four false starts, we were successful.

We got on the tram and went about five stops  to get to the market area.  Before we left the tram station, we looked around to get our bearings so we would know which side we needed to get back on and which tram would go near our hotel.  We kept getting ourselves confused and finally a young American student studying in Dusseldorf took pity on us and walked us down to look at the electronic sign board and told us what we needed to look for.  He was very helpful and personable and after we thanked him we found ourselves on the streets of Dusseldorf in all of its Christmas glory.

I think we were in the high end of the shopping district of Dusseldorf.  It was much busier here than we had seen the entire trip but then, it was Saturday afternoon and ten days till Christmas.  We passed by Prada, Dior, Chanel, Cartier and Burberry.

In the grassy area in the middle of the park separating  the north and south lanes of the Konigsallee, was a skating rink.  Along the sides were food vendors.  My friend got a big sausage in a hotdog roll and I , I got the best meal!  It was  cheese wheel fettuccine pasta.  Basically it was cooked fettuccine that was put in a hollowed out center section of a big wheel of parmesan cheese and the cook scraped some of the cheese into the pasta.  Some truffle oil was sprinkled on top and the chef  kept stirring the fettuccine around and around so it would pick up part of the parmesan and blend all the flavors together.  Truly a decadent fettuccine Alfredo dish.  It was so good I wanted to lick my plate.

We kept walking down and around corners finding different markets throughout the city.  We found a large ferris wheel at one of the markets that we had seen from the ship as we sailed through Dusseldorf on the Rhine on our way to Amsterdam.  We  found very few restrooms and went into a large department store.  The line was about 45 minutes long but what choice did we have?

Many of the vendor stalls we saw were very similar to what we had seen at other markets nevertheless, it was fun to look at what they were selling and be part of the experience.

The street decorations were similar to what we saw in other markets but only more of them as this was a large city. 

It quickly turned dark and then the city really shone bright and festive.  In the center of the park was a beautiful water feature with lights at the end that glowed as we walked along the sidewalk to get back to the underground station for our tram. 

Thanks to our student from earlier the afternoon, we found the correct tram going in the right direction and knew when to get off the tram to walk back to our hotel.  It was a long day beginning in Amsterdam leaving the ship, getting to the train station, finding our train, getting off and finding our hotel and then going to the markets in Dusseldorf and finally back on the tram to our hotel.

Tomorrow, we go back to Amsterdam, which will be our last night before heading back to the United States from our journey.

 

Advertisements

Arriving and Leaving Amsterdam – What we did and saw

Friday was our last full day on our boat.  We were still sailing on the Rhine in the morning and as we looked out at the countryside along the river we saw the fog rising up from the ground.  It looked a little ethereal.  There is definitely a different landscape look in Germany.  No mega homes, at least along the Rhine like you can find in the United States.  There were some beautiful homes along the river and we were told that they were purchased by many wealthy Americans and I could see why.  It just looked like a serene life, not much traffic, seemed like there was less hustle and bustle than what most of us American are used to.

We docked within very close proximity to Centraal Station, the main train station in Amsterdam.  We were happy about that since the next morning we were going to go to Dusseldorf and hoped to purchase our tickets sometime today at the station and it would make walking to the station on Saturday that much easier.

After lunch we again were divided into groups to take a bus tour of the city.  To be honest, the bus tour did not show what I think is the beauty of Amsterdam.  We were in some run down neighborhoods and I was glad that I had been to Amsterdam before because if this was my first visit, like it was my cruise mate’s, then I probably wouldn’t come back.

There was a little park that had a windmill so we went there and all had a photo op with the windmill.

Back onto the bus, driving around again and finally let off in an underground garage by the Van Gogh Museum and Rijk museums.  We had about 75 minutes to walk around and then we met again to walk to our canal cruise. 

Honestly, forty five minutes was not enough to go into one of the museums.  It almost felt like a waste of time that they built in.  Luckily they had some stalls selling items but mainly food and beer – similar to a Christmas market and we all walked around and around them.  

These stalls flanked a small skating rink which was fun watching  Some  skaters skated like they had never done it before and I’m sure some of them hadn’t.  

While walking around I was able to go into the combined gift shop for both the Rijk and VanGogh – they were near the meeting spot for our tour guide.  Paramount in my mind was the lack of space for anymore souvenirs – remember I had the reindeer hide from Strasbourg!

Everyone got to the meeting spot early.  We then walked to the canal cruise dock and by the time we got there it was already getting dusky – another reason to me why Amsterdam was not being shown in her best light.  Things I had remembered from before we didn’t see this time  like the large parking lot for only bicycles.  Speaking of bicyclists, there appeared to be fewer than when I was here before.  Of course, being winter and late afternoon could have a lot to do with it.

one of the signs I saw by the stalls

We went through several of the canals on the cruise.  We saw the houses along the Singel Canal that were slanting and crooked due to the rotting piling underneath the homes.  We also went near the Anne Frank house as well as a church with a beautiful steeple.  It wasn’t dark enough to see many of the lights yet it was dark enough that nothing was clear and sharp – just, in my opinion, a not very good time to take the tour.  I believe we could have gotten to Amsterdam earlier in the day, perhaps even in the morning from Cologne.  By car it is about 2 1/2  and if we left Cologne around 2:00 in the afternoon why couldn’t we have gotten to Amsterdam earlier so we could see everything during the day as well as having free time – which we didn’t until 5:00 ish.

Look closely and you can see the houses leaning.

We were disappointed in the day as we had purchased online at home tickets for the Ann Frank House for a 4:30 tour but if we had done the tour, we would have missed the canal cruise which my cruise mate didn’t want to miss and I don’t blame her.  The order for the afternoon was bus tour, free 75 minutes and then the canal cruise.  I wished the free time was at the end so we could have done it all and go to the Ann Frank House but sometimes you just have to make choices and can’t do it all.

The canal boat took us close to our ship.  Once off the ship we decided to walk to Centraal Station and get our tickets for Dusseldorf.  Now I have purchased many trains tickets in Europe from kiosks and never had any problems.  We walked inside the station and see a ticket office.  The manned counters are for local trains/buses only and we were international – going back into Germany.  I found a machine, punched in what I wanted, found the train to and from and tried to pay.  My credit card was declined even though I had been using it throughout the trip.  Luckily I also brought my Charles Schwab ATM card (no money conversion fees and no foreign transaction fees) and was able to use it.  We had a lot of problems with the ticket machine.  We found someone who works for the train company to help us and even he had problems.  The first machine would make our reservations, gave us a confirmation number but never let us actually print the ticket.  We had to cancel out, use the confirmation number and go to another machine.  When we tried the second machine to book my friend’s ticket, it wouldn’t let us do it.  It probably took us, with help, about 90 minutes to book and print our tickets.  The agent was really helpful, told us what track it would be on and pulled up on his phone the stops we would be making and had me take a picture of his phone with my phone.

Our last night we had plenty of time to say goodbye to those we met, exchanged email addresses or FB names for those we wanted to stay in contact with and packed our bags.  Now we were off for an adventure on our own – Dusseldorf!

 

Cologne or Koln

We arrived in Cologne in the early evening and some passengers chose to have their dinner in town as well as walking around. With temperatures around 30 degrees I chose to stay on board and participate in the Christmas activities.

A Christmas tree was brought into the lounge and we were given a box of ornaments to decorate it.  There were two other trees that others were adding to the decorations already on t.  We tried to have fun and sabotage the other trees but no one did it back.  One tree was all white and we would add bright pink ornaments OR put a banana in the tree.  No contest, just a fun activity.  We also, with the crew, sang Christmas carols.  Then, the guest of honor arrived – St Nicholas (Santa Claus) came by.  We all lined up to sit on his lap and receive a gift.  Some of the lap sitters had a LOT of fun on Santa’s lap.  IMG_1873

Up the next morning fortified with my daily oatmeal, juice and tea we walked outside to meet our tour guide.  We were divided for most of the trip into four different groups based on the color ticket you picked up on your way out.  We found that for the most part we were part of the blue group.  With our Whisper Boxes we then held the receiver up to the large lollipop sign that the guides held up high for us to follow.  By touching the receiver to the lollipop we were then on their frequency.

We docked in town so there was no need to have a bus take us to Cologne.  Due to all the changes in this cruise because of the water level we were told that we did not have scheduled a tour of the cathedral in Cologne.  That was a disappointment for us as on this cruise we did not have any tours of any cathedral.

We walked along the river and saw some very old buildings with the dates written on them.  Cologne was originally a Roman settlement and during some of the construction of the city post WW II, many Roman artifacts were found.  Most of Cologne was destroyed during WW II and a master plan was developed for the rebuilding of the city.  With most of the downtown area destroyed, it was easy to lay out a new plan for the city and wider streets for the automobile.img_1655

Wandering up and down some pedestrian streets we saw unique statues including one on the side of a building of a little boy pulling down his pants and “mooning” the church across the park.  Germany was once Catholic but with the reformation many chose the Protestant denomination.  This little boy was protesting something that the church had done.

We walked past an excavation site where they were going to build  however, once they were digging Roman artifacts were found.  They were taken to the Roman Germanic  museum that housed many of these artifacts.  We were able to look into the windows at the museum and could go back on our own if we wanted to.

Before you knew it we were at the Cologne Cathedral.  Due to the fact that there were many changes to our itinerary, the ship somehow lost our reservation to tour the cathedral.  It was suggested by our tour guide that we go in before noon as a service would be happening then.  

We were at the end of the tour and followed out tour guide’s recommendation and visited the cathedral.  I was somewhat upset at how loudly people were talking in the church.  It is a church and a place for reverence.  I chose not to take any pictures inside the church but it was beautiful.  This church was begun in 1248 and continued being built until around 1478 when it was stopped for about three hundred years.  Building began again in 1880.  It is the largest Gothic church in northern Europe.  Unfortunately during World War II the church was hit fourteen times yet it still stood.

Across the street from the cathedral we decided to go into a small restaurant, Cafe Reichard,  to get something warm/hot to drink and use the rest rooms.  Once we sat down we decided we  wanted more and ordered a light lunch.  The soup was absolutely delicious and so was the hot tea.  If you are in Europe and looking for restrooms, always look for the stairs and go down.  Make sure you bring a 50 cent euro piece for admission.

Our tour guide told us about a miniature tourist train that went around the city to four of the eight Christmas markets in Cologne.  It was at the corner where the cafe was. While we waited we looked across the street and saw a fun and unique building.

When the train arrived we boarded quickly and sat down.  Turns out it wasn’t free as we thought but was 10 euros. It was well worth it to be taken to the markets.

We paid and went to our first Christmas market, then our second which was on the river, our third which seemed very popular with the after work crowd and then back again to where we began, the market by the Cathedral.  What the markets carried was very similar as were the prices but there were still somethings that were very unique.


A bar at the market by the river with Santa on the roof

Walking back to the ship we were a little sad as we knew this was our last Christmas market on the cruise.  We knew that the next day we would be in Amsterdam and they didn’t have any while we were there.  We did have our collection of gluhwein mugs as a wonderful souvenir of the Christmas markets.

My cruise mate and I did have another city to look forward to – after the cruise we were going to go to Dusseldorf and was excited about that.

Rudesheim, Germany by Day

Once again the little train was waiting for us as we stepped off the AMAPrima.  We had several options for this morning but we decided to stay in Rudesheim for our tour of Siegfried’s Mechanical Musical Museum.  This is a stop for almost all river cruises and one most people would have overlooked on their own.  The building isn’t very large and you can do the tour in about 45 minutes to an hour.

The museum is housed in an old fifteenth century historic building in Rudesheim around the corner from the main street.  This museum was founded by Siegfried Wendel who began collecting and restoring these old mechanical musical instruments.  Some of these instruments were one of a kind and you will not see it anywhere in the world.

Other instruments were one of only several hundred.  People would donate to Siegfried old instruments for him to restore.  For those that he could not restore he saved them so he could use parts from those instruments to restore other instruments that could be salvaged For those instruments, Siegfried was able to take parts and pieces from those that would not be restored and put them in the ones that could be restored.  These mechanical musical instruments were used to entertain people in the 19th century.  You would see these at World Fairs of this time.

As we were taken around by our period dressed tour guide she explained some of these instruments and was able to have a few played for us.  Who doesn’t remember the organ grinder?  Obviously there was no live monkey but we did have the organ and we could take turns “grinding”.  One of their prized possessions is a machine that is a combination of a piano and six violins.  The one that drew me in was somewhat grotesque – it was a machine that had lots of puppets in it and some of those puppets were little monkeys with what appeared to be real teeth in their mouth.  I was mesmerized but repulsed at the same time.There were about 350 mechanical instruments from the small music boxes to these large mechanical instruments.

When the tour ended we were given tickets to ride the gondola up to the a famous statue and a beautiful view of the river.  If you would like to listen to some of the music these machine played, click here and here. We were riding over the vineyards and if it had been earlier in the fall, we would have seen the grapes and the workers harvesting these grapes for the vineyards.  We gathered at the top with our tour guide and began our walk but for us it was too much German history that we were unfamiliar with.  We said goodbye to our group and took the gondola back down and since it was almost 11:00, we decided it was time to stroll through the Christmas market.

If you go on a Christmas Market river cruise, you might want to make your purchases here in Rudesheim.  Items that I had seen at other markets, were here as well but they were less expensive.  Perhaps because it was early in the day as far as the market is concerned, it was not very crowded.  It was a very pleasant experience walking around here. I thoroughly enjoyed this market and other than being in Strasbourg, this was my favorite market.   There was a restaurant where the entrance was lined with about forty Christmas trees.  Christmas trees were all over the place, even leaning against a store on the outside.  We found a Christmas trees made out of crates – you could make a tree out of anything!

We were given the option of walking back to the ship or going to the meeting place to catch “the train”.  My travel mate took the train, I walked back.  The night before in the dark I thought it was going to be a long walk home but in the light of day, it wasn’t.  All I had to do was point my feet downhill and walk to the river and then take a left.

We left around 1:00 in the afternoon so we could cruise the Rhine Gorge while it was still daylight – remember sunset happened around 4:30.  This is the section of the Rhine where there are many castles and the famed Lorelei Rock.

Legend has it a siren was sitting on the rock, combing her golden hair and sailors would be so distracted by her beauty that they crashed into the rock.  Here is a song about Lorelei sung by Ella Fitzgerald.

Rudesheim, Germany by Night

We left Heidelberg and sailed toward Rudesheim, Germany.  After dinner we had a choice of two excursions.  We could go into a wine cellar and have a sampling of some of the fine Reisling wines grown in this region OR we could go to a little restaurant and sample the famed Rudesheim coffee.

You might ask “what is Rudesheim coffee” and I have the answer for you.  It is coffee with brandy, lit on fire and then whipped cream and chocolate sprinkles on top,  though where I am from they are called jimmies. (PS virtual points if you can tell where I am from by the word jimmies – if you know me, please don’t spoil it).

p1070634
All Aboard!

Guess which one I chose?  Yep, the wine tasting.  After we finished our dinner on the ship, we put our jackets on and headed for the gangplank.  There, waiting for us on the other side, was a train that would take us near where we were going.

We walked to the wine tasting cave while the other group walked to the restaurant for the coffee.  The wine cave is all that I thought it would be as we walked down the stone steps into the cave.

There were tables with benches that we sat down on and in front of us was a small glass, the size of two shots glasses.  Our host reminded me of the late Robin Williams.  He spoke like him and looked a little bit like him but more importantly he had his sense of humor.  He seemed to have his finger on American foibles and that gave him fodder for humor. We all laughed quite a bit that evening.

We began with a dry Reisling, then a semi-dry and finally my favorite, a sweet.  He told us about ice wines and if they are truly ice wines they cost in the range of a hundred dollars for a bottle about half the size of regular wine bottles.  I think I would really like ice wines but at that price I’m not sure if I will ever get to sample one.  If you wanted to purchase some local wine, our host would certainly sell it to you. I have brought wine home from other countries using these wine skins from Amazon

I never had any bottles of wine broken.  I  made sure that they were secure in the suitcase and wouldn’t move around much.

As a side note, our son  purchased a case of wine from South Africa and checked it as luggage when returning to the US.  When arriving back in the US, he paid the customs tax on it since he was over the tax free amount.  The taxes were not much.  I think we all assume that custom taxes are very high but they really are not!  I believe, and do not hold this as gospel truth, that the duty tax is 3% of your purchase price so for some wines that he purchased at $17 USD he would pay that price plus 3%, much less than the $45 it is retailing for in the US.

Back to Rudesheim, since we were docked overnight in Rudesheim, rather than taking the train back, you could stay in the city.  Our cruise director knew of some restaurants and bars that would be fun.  HE also thought some of the Christmas markets might still be open.

A number of people did decide to stay and then walk back to the boat.  When we took the train up to the wine tasting, it seemed like a long ride – maybe about 15 minutes of weaving in and out of the streets but we were told that the walk back was much quicker and just to point your feet downhill.  We chose to go back to the boat.  I think we were a little concerned about roaming around at night trying to find the ship.  Hearing stories the next day, I’m sure some of the passengers on this ship closed several bars and had a great time.

For those wondering, here is the recipe for Rudesheim Coffee:

Coffee drink  with Asbach Uralt brandy and topped with vanilla whipped cream and grated chocolate.
Servings:
INGREDIENTS
3 cubes sugar
1-2 parts Asbach Uralt Brandy
hot coffee
vanilla whipped cream
grated chocolate
INSTRUCTIONS
Place cubes of sugar in a warm coffee cup
Add Asbach Uralt Brandy, set aflame. Stir and allow to burn 1 minute.
Fill up with hot coffee to within an inch of top of cup. Stir well.
Cover with layer of whipped cream with vanilla, and sprinkle with grated chocolate. 

Next up, our day in Rudesheim.

Heidelberg, Germany – our 1st German market

We left beautiful Strasbourg and set sail for Heidelberg, Germany.  The day was overcast and cool/cold depending on how cold you like it.  Once again, if you dress for the weather you’ll be fine.  For us, this was not the time to look fashionable but rather dress for warmth.  We took a bus from the  port up to the top of the hill over looking the Neckar River and the tile roofs on the buildings and homes below us.  I had always thought that the orange terra cotta tile roofs were found in hot, humid areas and not in European countries.  That’s what is so great about traveling – the knowledge you pick up!  The castle dominates the landscape.

Our tour guide was so smart and knowledgeable that we thought he was a little arrogant and obnoxious.

The buildings on the grounds of the castle are beautiful to look at even though they are more ruins than anything else.I think back to when these buildings were built and the sculptures were made and marvel at what they were able to do without modern machinery. Are you sometimes in awe at what was made centuries ago like I am?

We were taken into the lower level of one of the buildings where they had a brewery and a keg that held 60,000 gallons of beer! We were also told a tale of why there is a footprint in one of the stone bricks on the ground. Whether it is true or nor we will never know.

Afterwards we took the funicular down to the street level where we were able to go to the Christmas market which had just opened at 11:00 AM, like all the other markets we had been to.  This town was a little different in that it had a small skating rink where you could rent skates and have a spin on the ice.  At this market is where I had the best crepe that I had during the entire trip – a Grand Marnier crepe with sugar.  It was hot and steamy and had puffed up.  Eating that warmed my insides, of course I ate it with my mug of gluhwein.  What was not to like?

We enjoyed watching a preschool group walking around with their teachers.  The children were so cute and they all wore brightly color vests over the coats so they were quite visible.

There were some public restrooms in a trailer that were very clean and cost about .50 euros.  I don’t mind paying money for a clean restroom.  It seems to me that many European cities of a certain size have a carousel in the center of time because I have seen so many of them.

We met our group at 12:30 to walk to the bus for our return to the ship.  In the evening we would go on a wine tasting in Rudesheim and we were not going to miss that.

During the afternoon cruise, some took naps, some stayed in the lounge to meet gather and snack.  I think I sat in the lounge and fell asleep.  Vacationing is hard work and tiring! We wanted to be well rested since we had an evening tour!

If you are enjoying reading my blog posts, please consider signing up to be a subscriber and having these posts sent directly to your mailbox.

There is also a drop down menu on the right side that can help you find other trips, credit card information as well as points and miles.

 

Cruising Down the Danube to Passau, Germany

After we enjoyed our leisurely buffet breakfast in the dining room, we headed to the Lounge for a briefing by our Cruise Director Monika.  For those who have taken ocean cruises, the role of the cruise director is very different than it is on river cruising.  On AMAWaterways, as well as a few other river cruising lines, the cruise director is not on the staff of the cruise line.  They are hired to be responsible for the land portion of our trip and even a little more than that.  They are not out to sell you anything, nickel and dime you but rather to help make the most of your vacation.  They are particularly involved in the daily excursions and even tag along with some of the groups.  I’ll write more about that as this trip progresses.

At noon, we bid adieu to Vilshofen and set sail to Passau, which was about a 2 1/2 hour journey.  As we were sailing down the Danube, a Bavarian lunch was served to us featuring sausages, spetzles and suckling pig at the carving station.  Of course, they always have soups, salad bars, cheeses and much more.

Passau is known as the City of Three Rivers – the Danube, the Inn and the Ilz.  Perhaps because of the confluence of the three rivers, Passau had some of the worst flooding in their history back in 2013 when travel on the river came to a complete stop.  Flooding like this hadn’t happened since 1501!  The river in Passau rose more than 42 feet.  Many businesses and homes near the river were under 7 feet of water.  If you can see in this photograph, the second highest mark is from the June 2013 floods.  Whenever you travel by river you do not want high water or low water.

P1030593

Passau is home to 5 breweries and the smallest, Peschl Brau, just happened to be along the Danube where the ships were docked.  The outdoor terrace beckoned many of our travelers to sit, relax and drink some of the local brew.

P1030561

During my city tour, we visited St. Stephen’s Cathedral.  The site that the cathedral is on has had many churches on it, most of them destroyed by fire.  That seems to be a common theme with almost all of the churches and cathedrals that we visited on our trip.  The first church is said to have dated back to 730!  The current church was built between 1668 and 1693.  What is notable about this cathedral is that it has the largest cathedral organ in the world. The organ currently has 17,774 pipes and 233 registers and it should be known that the “organ” is really several separate organ that can be played from one or more consoles.  Here are a few pictures of the cathedral:

P1030575

P1030576

P1030571

P1030583

As we continued on in our “city tour” we came across an artist area. What was remarkable about this area was the number of hanging umbrellas.  Just a touch of whimsy.  It did remind me of a similar street in Sydney that had hanging bird cages.  Somehow we always find an unusual street.

P1030602

Finally, for my tour, we walked by a shop that sold cuckoo clocks so if you are in the market for one, and many tourists are when they come to Bavaria, then this is the shop for you.

P1030573

While I was doing the “city tour” Blogger Hubby was with the active walkers and they were hiking the very large hill in Passau which, when you were hiking to the top gave you wonderful panoramic views of the city and river.  He found that they went at a quick pace and the guide didn’t want to stop for pictures.  Some people did become frustrated and left the group and went on their own.  Nevertheless, he found that for him, it was the type of active outdoor activity that he enjoyed.
P1030411Finally, for me, no tour was complete without stopping to get a lemon gelato and I obliged myself.  It’s the only flavor I order and I always feel so refreshed after having my daily gelato (or two).

After dinner, our entertainment for the evening was a young man and woman who comprised “The Sound of Austria” singing favorite tunes from operas, operettas and musicals – mainly from “The Sound of Music”.  It was an enjoyable evening.

We departed Passau around 10:00 that evening as we headed to Linz, home of the world famous Linzer Torte.

 

 

Vilshofen, Germany and the AMA Prima with Pictures of the Ship

We got back on our buses in Regensburg for a couple more hours drive to Vilshofen.  We were all getting a little excited to get onboard our ship and begin our cruise.

The Danube River, or the Donau as it is known in Europe, is Europe’s second longest river flowing almost 1,800 miles from its source in the Black Forest in Germany to its mouth in Romania where it empties out into the Black Sea.  Vilshofen, where we were to embark on our ship is on the southern edge of the southern Bavarian Forest where the Vils and Wolfach flow into the Danube.

The buses pulled up to the dock and we walked across the gangplank to the lounge area of the ship.  There we would have delicious little pastries and treats as well as refreshing fruit drinks as we would wait to be called to the reception desk and given the keys to our room.  While we waited, we met the crew, our cruise director Monika and our Captain.  It didn’t take long for them to call us.

Cruise Director Monika from Budapest
Cruise Director Monika from Budapest

We did not book a full balcony as others in our group did but instead we had the French balcony.  The name is a little misleading because it is not what you think of a balcony.  It is essentially a sliding glass door that will slide all the way open with horizontal bars across so you will not fall out – that’s it.  It does allow fresh air and there are two chairs inside by the French balcony.  Other staterooms had two balconies – the traditional one where you sit outside and a French balcony.  I went into one of those rooms to get pictures for you.  If you have never taken a river cruise, the staterooms are small but functional.  On AMA Waterways, all rooms have computer/television for our use as well as free WiFi.

P1030520

 

Computer on desk with free WiFi
Computer on desk with free WiFi
Stateroom with an open balcony that you could sit on as well as a French balcony
Stateroom with an open balcony that you could sit on as well as a French balcony
Stateroom on the first deck where most of your room is under the water line. They do have ample light with the window - much more light than I thought. This is affectionally called "Aquarium Class"
Stateroom on the first deck where most of your room is under the water line. They do have ample light with the window – much more light than I thought. This is affectionally called “Aquarium Class” and is the least expensive stateroom category.

P1030525

We were in a Category C stateroom and if you look at the deck plans and the above photo you’ll see that the shower is triangular in shape.  Only one door slides and you are getting into the shower on the narrow end where two sides of the triangle meet.  Just wanted to “alert” you to this design flaw, in my opinion.

Dining Room where there was Open Seating
Dining Room where there was Open Seating
Not a pool but a large hot tub
Not a pool but a large hot tub

There is a pool/ whirlpool with a bar and stools but no bartender assigned there. The pool is about 98 degrees and it is regulated remotely so it can’t be cooled down. Nevertheless it felt good to me particularly when I got out.

Upper level on ship where you could lounge - other end had large umbrellas for shade
Upper level on ship where you could lounge – other end had large umbrellas for shade
loved this lounging are with rattan furniture and comfy pillows
loved this lounging area with rattan furniture and comfy pillows

I love the rooftop at the front of the ship as it has unique seating arrangements. It is rattan sectional furniture set in a large U shape figure with lots of pillows. Inside each U are 2 square shaped coffee tables. There are also 4 person regular tables with rattan chairs. The lounge is very nicely appointed. There is a small game room to the left of the lounge with a fireplace glowing but no heat thank goodness. The two tables in there are too low to play games on. Also they do not have cards for your use since they sell cards but there is a nice assortment of games and books in the mini library.

Heading to my favorite spot on the couches.
Heading to my favorite spot on the couches.

After we all got settled, we left the ship to go back on the dock for an Ocktoberfest – which was our welcoming reception.  I was having too much fun to take pictures but I did meet a lot of very nice people.  We were given two tickets for beer each which I initially thought was a little stingy but there were so many tickets floating around that there was no need for worry.  We had an Oompa Band, German dancers and they even got us up for dancing.  This was a wonderful way to begin our cruise.

P1030549

We spent the night docked in Vilshofen and didn’t leave till mid-morning the next day.  Many people checked out the bicycles that the ship carried for us (about 25 of them), others walked back into town and others just relaxed on the ship.

Excitement was growing in all of us as we introduced ourselves, asked where they were from and began to make fast friends for this one week journey down the not-so-blue Danube.

P1030551

Regensburg, Germany – the Beginning of our AMA Cruise Down the Danube

After our time in Amsterdam, Nuremberg and Prague, it was time to get on with the focus of our trip – our AMA Waterways cruise down the Danube.  We elected to do the “cruise only” portion  but the majority of the passengers chose to do a pre-cruise in Prague with the cruise line. The additional cost for the pre-cruise with AMA Waterways covered transfers from the airport, three nights at the cruise hotel, the Old Town Hilton, a tour of the city and transportation to Vilshofen with a stop and tour in Regensburg where we were to embark on the AMAPrima.

We found out from our travel agent that we could pay for the transportation only with the group to Vilshofen from Prague even though we did not do the pre cruise portion. Since we do have hotel points, and perhaps even if we didn’t, we decided to make our own pre cruise arrangements.  For us, it makes economic sense as well as somewhat of a travel adventure to plan our pre and post cruise.  We are not afraid to research what to see and do as well as public transportation and tours with guides.  However, some people are a little more timid about venturing out on their own or they don’t want to think and plan or make any decisions and have all the details arranged for them – then this is ideal.  There is no right or wrong but rather what works for you and for many this works well for them.

The bus trip included a walking tour of Regensburg on our way to Vilshofen, another small city and a UNESCO World Heritage site because of its medieval city center.  Off we went on our buses for a few hours bus ride which included a stop at a McDonald Cafe and before you knew it, we were in Regensburg.

We met our tour guide at the area where the buses parked, across the river from the city area.  She walked us across the Old Stone Bridge, built in the 12th century and the one that the Crusaders used to get to the Holy Land.  While we were there the bridge was under construction having some needed repairs made.  The city’s architecture includes ancient Roman, Romanesque, and Gothic buildings. Regensburg’s 11th to 13th century architecture still defines the character of the town marked by tall buildings, dark and narrow lanes, and strong fortifications. The buildings include medieval Patrician houses and towers, a large number of churches as well as the 12th century Stone Bridge that I previously mentioned.

P1030496 (1)

P1030390

P1030509

P1030512

The cathedral in Regensburg, Dom St. Peter, is a massive cathedral with twin spires that can be seen all over the city.  It was built in the 12th century in the Gothic style, though like many other historic churches and buildings, it had a Baroque “facelift” in the 16th century and then later in the 19th century reverted back to Gothic.  This cathedral, like many that we saw in cities, have been undergoing a cleaning, getting rid of the black soot that is on the outside walls.  The church, in 2009, finally received its organ, a massive free hanging organ.  The 5,871 pipes in this organ is able to fill the space in the church with its beautiful sound.  If you are in Regensburg on a Sunday, you can go to church service and listen to this mighty organ.

P1030517

P1030392

After we had our tour we were free to have lunch on our own and we knew exactly where we wanted to eat.  The oldest continually operated sausage restaurant in the world is in Regensburg.  Workers building the 12th century Old Stone Bridge needed a place to eat and thus, the Sausage Kitchen was born.  The speciality of the  kitchen is the thin, long fried sausages served with rolls made with caraway seeds, home-made sauerkraut and mustard.  I’m not normally one that enjoys sausages or sauerkraut but I’ll ell you that I ate it all up.  We sat outside on picnic benches but you also have the option of easting inside the restaurant.  The restaurant is next to the Old Stone Bridge and on the Danube River.  Can’t beat that scenery.

P1030519

P1030518

P1030388

After a little more “looking” around, we boarded our buses again for Vilshofen and the AMA Prima – our home for the next week.

Our Day in Nuremberg, Germany

When I booked our KLM flight using 25,000 American Express Membership Reward points per person for a one way flight I knew that I wouldn’t be able to get a flight directly to Prague from Amsterdam. When that happens the best advice I can give is to look for alternate cities that might be close to where you want to go.  For us, it was Nuremberg, Germany.

Nuremberg was a city that I have never been to.  All I knew of it was that it was the site of the famous Nuremberg War Trials that were held after World War II as well as the parade grounds where the Nazi soldiers would march around as a show of force.   I began looking at other things to see and do using Trip Advisor as my guide.  I knew there were a lot of Nazi related buildings to see but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to see them or not. Since we were not going to be there very long, we actually decided not to do the Nazi tour and instead focus on the city as it is now and also to see it as the medieval major city that it was.

I’m so fortunate that we were able to spend a night here as I probably wouldn’t have vacationed in Nuremberg.  Nuremberg Airport is a small airport and we had no problem getting around or finding the ticket kiosks for the trains outside of the airport.  A German gentleman who was on our flight decided to “stay” with us as we purchased our tickets and directed us to the appropriate track.  We have found that people are friendly and helpful particularly if you ask for help.

We stayed at the Holiday Inn Hauptbahnhof which indeed was a few short blocks to the train station where our bus for Prague would depart from.  We did not use points as the rooms were not very expensive and it was a good opportunity to earn some points and there was also an IHG promotion going on.  The room was fine and it would be what Americans would call small but I believe it was an average size for European hotel rooms.

When I asked the person working the front desk for a recommendation for dinner she was quick to recommend Barfuber located in the pedestrian mall area inside the old walled city.  It was a lively spot and one that seemed to attract many local residents as well as a few tourists. I had the fried dumplings and Blogger Husband had roasted pork with gravy and a bread dumpling.  Portions were more than ample, the beer was delicious and we had a great time here people watching.  If in Nuremberg I would definitely recommend this restaurant.

IMG_1729

IMG_1713

P1030244

The next day we arose bright and early and after having a good breakfast at our hotel we took off to walk around the city.  We had a 4:40 PM reservation on the bus to Prague so we were anxious to see as much of Nuremberg as we could.

I was really amazed at the intact wall that went around the older part of the city.  I’ve been in other cities that were walled, but this one was spectacular since it appeared to me that the entire wall was intact and not just a portion.

P1030259

One of the entrances to get inside the walled portion was also the entrance to the Handwerkerhof where many of the items are handmade, especially those involving metal.  If you were to be here in December, this would be a very popular area for the Christmas markets.

IMG_1717

P1030248

P1030252

Since we were up and out early none of the stops were open but we did do some window shopping and planned to come back on our way back to our hotel.  We then walked toward the open air market…the  Hauptmarkt where fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese, food trucks, soaps, etc all for sale.  Apparently we were there during the harvest of the white asparagus and I was told Germans love their white asparagus!

P1030267

We continued walking and headed toward the castle admiring all the buildings and scenery on the way.  Like almost all castles, it is an up hill walk but as you were walking up there were spots to stop and view Nuremberg from an elevated position.  I still am amazed at the number of terra cotta tiled roofs  – roofs that I had only previously seen on our south.  They certainly added color to the landscape.  After walking around the castle it was a much easier descent back down to the street.

P1030286

 

P1030273

We headed back to the Hauptmarkt for some “looking” and “buying” and perhaps lunch as well.  We found the sandwiches we wanted and took them to the bridge over the Pegnitz River which ran through the pedestrian mall area.  It was a beautiful spot to eat our lunch.  The buildings along side of the river or even in the middle of the fork of the river  seemed like they came out of a fairytale.  What do you think?

P1030261

P1030275

P1030281

P1030282

P1030301

I’m so glad that we were able to spend some time in Nuremberg and it is a city that I would love to come back and spend more time seeing some of the sights that we didn’t get the chance to see during our 24 hours.

To get to our final destination of Prague we looked at traveling on a train or, as suggested on Trip Advisor, to take a bus. Hmm, buses just aren’t my thing but the train required a layover and a change where the bus would be a direct route from Nuremberg to Prague and would take about 2 hours less than the train.  I figured I could “suck it up” for a few hours and if it were really bad, then it would give me fodder for a great blog.  The bus left from the train station and it was a double decker bus.  It was wonderful.  There were probably about 15 of us on the bus and we all had plenty of room.  As I mentioned, it was a direct bus that took us through the countryside on our way to Prague.  I was amazed at the hundreds and hundreds of solar cells that were alongside the highway in Germany.  Again, this was a rural area dotted with farms except for all the solar cells.  I wonder why our country hasn’t adopted this idea of harnessing solar power?  We had arranged with our hotel in Prague to send a car to pick us up and as we got off of the bus, there was a gentleman holding a sign with our name on it.  We jumped in his car and off we went to our hotel in Prague.