Monthly Archives: November 2016

Truffles Anyone? Visiting a Truffle Farm in the Rhone Valley

One of the tours we were excited about on our Rhone River cruise on AMAWaterways was the visit to a truffle farm.  I’ve heard of truffles but the kind I like came from Godiva chocolates and have a filling.  These are not that kind but rather the kind that grow underground and are the fruity body of a fungus, something akin to an earthy mushroom  They are prized in cooking particularly in French cuisine.

Harvesting of the black truffle takes place from November to March.  They grow underground which makes them difficult to find.  In years past pigs were used to detect them but now dogs are primarily used because pigs tended to eat many of the truffles they found.  The farm that we visited used Labrador Retrievers.

In order to “train” the dogs to find these delectable treats, they would rub a mother dog’s belly as she was nursing her pups.  The pups would associate the smell of the truffle with “goodness” as they were suckling.  Furthermore, once the pups had been weaned, they would cut up some of the truffles and add them to their food – once again imprinting on them that truffles were good.

Much like animal trainers of seals, dolphins or any other animal rewards their animal with a treat after they have done a trick, the truffle harvester also carries a treat bag wit them when they are out with their dog to give to the dog after the find the truffle and to get them to not eat the truffle.

The truffle harvester walks through a truffle orchard, which is generally a grove of oak trees, watching the dog’s behavior.  The dog has his nose to the ground sniffing for that truffle aroma that he has come to know.  The dog will either mark the spot with his foot and the harvester will dig it up or the dog will dig it up with its paw.  At this point the harvester needs to act quickly to get the truffle before it is consumed by the animal.  Once the harvester gets the truffle then the dog gets his doggie treat.

There are a few different types of truffles – black (associated with France) and white (associated with Italy).  The white ones tend to cost the most, about $175 per ounce and the black ones about $100 an ounce.  As you can tell, harvesting truffles takes lots of time and that factors in to their price.

We found this tour to be excellent.  After we saw the dog digging up the truffles, we went inside their “shop” area and was treated to slices of baguettes with truffles and truffle oils on them.  They were delicious, so delicious that we purchased a bottle of truffle oil to bring home.  This is an ingredient that we have seen in cooking and now we have it to enhance our flavors.

smelling the area for that distinctive smell of truffles
smelling the area for that distinctive smell of truffles
staying close to the dog to be able to get the truffle
staying close to the dog to be able to get the truffle

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the size of a truffle
the size of a truffle
in the shop area where we were treated to truffle products
in the shop area where we were treated to truffle products

Papal Palace or Pont du Gard – which one to choose?

We had one of our first dilemmas on this trip when we arrived in Avignon as to which excursion we should choose?  We had our choice of The Papal Palace or Pont du Gard – both of which have the designation of World Heritage sites.

Avignon was once an important center of the Catholic Church .  It was so important that the papacy relocated here to Avignon during the 14th century.  Six papal concaves were held here and led to the election of Pope Benedict XII, Clement VI, Innocent VI, Urban V, Gregory XI, and Antipope Benedict XIII.  I am not Catholic and did not know that there was another location other than the Vatican that was home to several popes.  So much history that I could learn but my other choice was…..

Pont du Gard is an aqueduct that’s considered a  masterpiece of Roman engineering.  Having worked in the school system where I lives, we studied the ancient civilizations and of course, Roman was considered one of the foremost ancient civilization.  We taught about the aqueducts but I had never seen one.  What finally helped me decide to choose Pont du Gard was that a friend of mine is a teacher and her students were learning about different structures.  She had asked if I could send back some post cards for her students to see, ask questions about and learn about different structures.

Obviously with that request I knew our decision was made – this is what we visited:

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Come With Us to South America – Really!

We are already planning our next big trip.  We decided to take 2017 off from a big trip and are focusing on 2018 – February 14th to be specific.

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After a false start with Holland America, we have booked a cruise on the Emerald Princess, one of the ships with Princess Cruise Line.  We sail from Valparaiso (outside of Santiago) Chile to Buenos Aires, Argentina.  This cruise will sail for 2 weeks exploring the southern half of South America – a land that I have not been to and am anxious to see.  The Chilean fjords are more numerous than in all of Scandinavia, a visit to the bottom of the world when we stop in Ushuaia, another stop in the Falkland Island.  We will also stop in Montevideo, Uruguay, Puerto Montt, Puerto Arenas, Amalia Glacier, Puerto Madryn, and around Cape Horn.  The scenery will be nothing short of spectacular with mountains, glaciers, wildlife include the Emperor penguins.

Glaciers galore
Glaciers galore

What I do when we cruise is find local tour guides to take us around while we are in port.  I do this for several reasons.  First, I like smaller tours and just hate being on a 44 passenger bus always having to wait for someone who thinks that the time to be back at the bus doesn’t apply to them and I like to customize as much as possible our tour.  Finally, the price is general either the same for a smaller, more intimate experience or it is less .  Less is always good.

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The beautiful glaciers

Of course, the price depends on which stateroom category you choose and its location.  Yo would need to talk to our group travel agent, Michelle, to get the price.

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You may be asking yourself why am I bringing this up now.  It’s because Princess is having a special promotion where you get your gratuities free!  That’s right and that is a big savings.  Also depending which stateroom you choose, you may also receive a discount.  This promotion ends on November 16th.  If you are interested in being part of my group, getting special pricing and benefits, I suggest you contact our travel agent at michelle@mccabeworld.com or call her directly at 703-762-5049screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-3-35-44-pm

Touring Arles, Roman Ruins and Van Gogh’s Asylum

Arles, once a metropolis of Roman Gaul, developed into a symbol of Christianity through the colosseum, amphitheater and the Roman baths that were built there. Bull fighting is held twice a year in the same arena (colosseum) that was the scene of Roman games in the first century.  We all know that Van Gogh loved Arles and many of his famous paintings show his love of the area but did you know that Picasso also spent a lot of time in the area?  He spent a good part of his life in a political exile in France.  He was a Spaniard through and through and, loved bullfighting. The last 12 years of his life were spent in the village near Arles. He would travel with his friends to see the bullfights at this arena.  Many of his later paintings and drawings were inspired by what he saw in Arles.  These Romanesque monuments have a UNESCO World Heritage designation.  It is our goal when we travel to seek out these sites. p1060291

After we visited the quarry featuring the works of Marc Chagall we rode the bus again to some of the Roman ruins and Triumphal Arch near the asylum where Van Gogh lived for a year.   I’m still so amazed at these structures and how they were built by hand – no machinery, cranes or other modern day machines that helped build these still standing structures.  Our guide told us that the Romans loved arches and would construct them to commemorate victories.  This was also the case in St. Remy where these ruins were.

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We walked across the street to the asylum where Van Gogh lived for about a year. During the time that he was self committed he painted various scenes all around the grounds of the asylum including the “Irises”, “Starry Nights”, “The Wheat Field”, “Sunflowers in a Vase”, scenes around St. Paul’s Asylum and so many more.  What was interesting to me if that they had reproductions of Van Gogh’s paintings propped on easels at the spot where he painted the landscapes so you can see what he saw when he painted the pictures.  Remember how I spoke of the mistral winds in the Rhone Valley?  If you look at Van Gogh’s paintings you’ll see swirling brush strokes which, I was told, represent the mistral winds.  When I think of Van Gogh, I generally think of these paintings which are representative of the Provence area.  During his one year in at the asylum, he painted 151 paintings.p1040891

p1060267p1040887p1040896Hope you enjoy these pictures of Arles, the ruins and viewing the locations where Van Gogh painted some of his most famous works.